Bespoke workshops for academic year 2018 2019

 Event number Type  Target Audience Title Speaker Name Date 
1 Workshop All Faculty  Assessment 1 Dr. Mike Calvert Sunday, November 11, 2018
2 Workshop All Faculty  Assessment 2 Dr. Mike Calvert Monday, November 12, 2018
3 Workshop All Faculty  Feedback 1 Dr. Mike Calvert Tuesday, November 13, 2018
4 Workshop All Faculty  Feedback 2 Dr. Mike Calvert Wednesday, November 14, 2018
5 Workshop All Faculty  Icebreakers for Interactive Classrooms Dr. Raed Aljowder Wednesday, February 06, 2019
6 Workshop All Faculty  Are our students critical thinkers Dr. Zainab Ali Radha Thursday, February 07, 2019
7 Workshop All Faculty  Successful research project management: hands-on tools Prof. Benoît Rihoux Sunday, March 31, 2019
8 Workshop All Faculty  Successful research project management: hands-on tools Prof. Benoît Rihoux Monday, April 01, 2019
9 Workshop All Faculty  Successful research project management: hands-on tools Prof. Benoît Rihoux Tuesday, April 02, 2019
10 Workshop All Faculty  High Impact pedegogy Dr. Sana Almansoori Wednesday, April 03, 2019
11 Workshop All Faculty  Measuring the Intangibles Dr. Raed Aljowder Thursday, April 04, 2019
12 Capacity Building Workshop UTEL team Mentoring Training Dr. Sana Almansoori Thursday, April 04, 2019
17 Capacity Building Workshop UTEL team Assessment Training Dr. Sana Almansoori Wednesday, May 08, 2019
Title: Critical Thinking
Presenter and affiliation: Dr. Zainab M.Redha, UOB
Intended Audience: All academic staff
Duration: 1 day: 8:45 AM to 01:30PM
Location: S45-006 ZAIN E-Learning Center, Sakheir Campus, University of Bahrain

Summary:

The ability to think clearly and rationally is essential not only to the academics but also the occupational and personal development of their students. Thus, critical thinking needs to be considered as an integral part of our practice and not as an addition to the content. It is also one of the top required employability skills and is essential to everyday problem solving. This workshop will introduce participants to the basic concepts of critical thinking and the elements of thought. It will discuss the benefits of critical thinking and will identify main required skill and traits. The workshop will also include hands-on activities that are illustrate the application of different critical thinking strategies and techniques that foster deep learning. Furthermore, participants will be introduced to the art of Socratic questioning. They will learn how to question students Socratically; how to design assignments, activities, and tests that require critical thinking; and how to assess critical thinking skills and abilities.


Learning Outcomes:

After the completion of the function, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the definitions and constructs of Critical Thinking
  2. Recognize some of the benefits associated with teaching Critical Thinking
  3. Identify and apply some practical methods of developing students’ critical thinking skills.
  4. Evaluate his/her critical thinking abilities


Link to UK Professional Standard Framework (PSF):

A2
K2
V4

Title: Teaching and Learning Decisions in a Wicked Issue Climate
Presenter and affiliation: Dr Kate Cuthbert – The Higher Education Academy, UK
Intended Audience: Academic Staff, curriculum developers & teaching staff
Duration: 1 day: 8:45 AM to 3:00PM
Location:S45-006 ZAIN E-Learning Center, Sakheir Campus, University of Bahrain

Summary:

Today’s academic teams are designing curricula and developing learning opportunities that not only develop discipline knowledge but also prepare graduates for places of work, lifelong careers and contributing to society. But what does the outside world look like? The World Economic Forum emphasizes skills such as complex problem solving, creativity and critical thinking will be highly desirable as part of the 2020 workforce. Using Ritter and Webber’s, (1973) concept of Wicked Issues versus Tame Issues we can begin to challenge traditional pedagogies in higher education. Employers are demanding graduates who are competent in managing and responding to Wicked Issues- i.e. they are equipped to deal with situations that are ambiguous either because of their complex values tensions or their multifaceted nature so that clear solutions are yet to be realized. This workshop will expose how the environment, curriculum and teaching practices for developing such a graduate must focus on transferable skills such as enterprise and creativity.

During the first part of the day you will be invited to consider the wicked issues specific to your discipline and make connections to Meyer and Land’s (2005) work on threshold concepts. Using these as guiding principles you will begin to develop a curriculum blue print, highlighting the necessary graduate attributes within your discipline.

Which pedagogic approaches and teaching practices resonate with developing a graduate prepared to work with wicked issues?

The second part of the workshop will guide you through some design principles to help you consider how your teaching and learning activities will meet your identified graduate attributes. Throughout the workshop examples of good practice and case studies illustrating possible teaching options will be shared.


Learning Outcomes:

After the completion of the function, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the contemporary nature of Higher Education in relation to graduate attributes, wicked issues and threshold concepts
  2. Identify and discuss the merits of pedagogic practices that focus on the development of graduate attributes 
  3. Engage in an effective design process to develop learning opportunities that meet the requirements of the wicked issue landscape


Link to UK Professional Standard Framework (PSF):

A1.     Design and plan learning activities and/or programmes of study
A4.     Develop effective learning environments and approaches to student support and guidance
K2.     Appropriate methods for teaching, learning and assessing in the subject area and at the level of the academic programme
K3.     How students learn, both generally and within their subject/ disciplinary area(s)

Title: Students as partners or pawns in assessment: use of peer- and self-assessment to promote learning
Presenter and affiliation: Prof. Mark Davies – University of Sunderland, UK
Intended Audience: Staff who assess student work
Duration: 1 day: 8:45 AM to 3:00PM
Location:S45-006 ZAIN E-Learning Center, Sakheir Campus, University of Bahrain

Summary:

Student self-assessment has been practiced in higher education since the 1930s and typically follows a standard model (see Boud, 1995). Self-assessment is embedded in reflection and holistic concepts of learning and is thought to promote autonomy and independence in students, but is not widespread perhaps because academic staff do not have shared understandings of assessment. While self-assessment, and indeed peer-assessment, bring many advantages, the standard model is lacking in absorption of information by students and does not promote the internalization of feedback. Further it can be time-consuming for staff.

Typically students submit both the work for assessment and a self-assessment of the worth of the work based on agreed criteria or standards along with a suggested mark based on the self-assessment. The tutor then feeds back on the work and on the self-assessment and the student, if s/he wishes, compares the tutor assessment and the self-assessment. The student effectively completes all s/he is required to do prior to the deadline and can effectively be otherwise passive (a pawn) in the process.

During this workshop we will consider the advantages and disadvantages of the standard model and participants will be asked to discuss whether peer and self-assessment should be considered mandatory and how improvements to the standard model can be made. Participants should be prepared to challenge their own beliefs. The output of the workshop will be a revised model that staff can use with their students to promote learning in students in a non-threatening manner through engagement with feedback. The limitations of the proposed model will also be explored. There is no intention to change how students are assessed, but to use the outcomes of the assessment (the grade and feedback) in new ways that will bring students closer to the process of assessment and thus allow them to understand more about what we, as assessors, are looking for when we mark work.

Whatever model emerges from the workshop it will be considered in the light of the seven principles of good feedback practice identified by Nicol and Macfarlane-Dick (2006). Of course, being reflective practitioners, we will also consider the validity of the seven principles!


Learning Outcomes:

After the completion of the function, the participant will be able to:

  1. Critically examine her/his own practice in peer- and self-assessment.
  2. Appreciate how self-assessment models can be inclusive and empowering.
  3. Develop a workable system of self-assessment that will promote student learning


Link to UK Professional Standard Framework (PSF):

A1.     Teach and/or support learning
A2.     Assess and give feedback to learners
A3.     Develop effective learning environments and approaches to student support and guidance
K1.     Appropriate methods for teaching, learning and assessing in the subject area and at the level of the academic programme

Explicit links will be made to the areas highlighted above.  The workshop has a clear focus on assessment, enabling staff to become more comfortable with discussing assessment themes and sharing their practice with students.  Students will also be empowered as they move closer towards the assessment process.  Essentially the workshop is about A3 and considering alternative means of using standard assessments to promote learning.